The Best Seasons of Succession: Unraveling the Roy Family’s Epic Power Struggle.

Welcome to the world of Succession, where family drama and business politics collide to create a deliciously addictive TV show. If you’re a fan of sharp writing, complex characters, and power struggles, then you’re in for a treat. But with three seasons under its belt, which one should you start with? Fear not, fellow TV enthusiasts, because we’ve got you covered. In this listicle, we’ll be ranking the best seasons of Succession, from the nail-biting tension of season one to the shocking twists of season three. So sit back, grab some popcorn, and get ready to dive into the murky waters of the Roy family dynasty.
Season 2

Season 2

Season 2

Air Date: 2019-08-11

Beginning where season one dramatically left off, season two follows the Roy family as they struggle to retain control of their empire, and while the future looks increasingly uncertain, it is the past that threatens to ultimately destroy them.

Season 3

Season 3

Season 3

Air Date: 2021-10-17

Ambushed by his rebellious son Kendall at the end of Season 2, Logan Roy begins Season 3 in a perilous position. Scrambling to secure familial, political, and financial alliances, tensions rise as a bitter corporate battle threatens to turn into a family civil war.

Season 4

Season 4

Season 4

Air Date: 2023-03-26

In season four, the sale of media conglomerate Waystar Royco to tech visionary Lukas Matsson moves ever closer. The prospect of this seismic sale provokes existential angst and familial division among the Roys as they anticipate what their lives will look like once the deal is completed. A power struggle ensues as the family weighs up a future where their cultural and political weight is severely curtailed.

Season 1

Season 1

Season 1

Air Date: 2018-06-03

When aging, uber-wealthy patriarch Logan Roy—CEO of one of the world’s largest media and entertainment conglomerates—decides to retire, each of his four grown children follows a personal agenda that doesn’t always sync with those of their siblings—or of their father.